Service FAQ’s

We hope this information helps make you a more educated customer, but please note that these are just rough guidelines, and not all possible situations are covered. If you are experiencing a problem not listed below, feel free to let us know!

Shocked

High electric bills:

Like the previous complaint, if you are experiencing this problem in the cooling mode during the summer, you should probably call for service; assuming you have checked the obvious things – like an open window for example. This is for the most part, a winter-time heating complaint.

Many things can cause high electric bills. This includes a mistake from the electric company, a poorly insulated home, an open window, old, inefficient appliances such as electric water heaters, refrigerators and freezers, and of course, just wasting energy.

Ruling these things out, however, usually leaves just one culprit – the heating system, especially if it is a heat pump. The electric bill will naturally be higher in the coldest months because that is when your heat pump and the supplemental heat (electric resistance heat) runs the most. But if electric bills are higher than normal it is almost always a sign that there could be a problem with the heat pump.

This can range from minor things like a very dirty air filter or an iced-up outdoor unit, to severe problems like a damaged compressor.

Below is a list of possible causes. Items in Red usually require a service call. Items in Blue however can be addressed, some even fixed by the homeowner.

Red = Professional fix | Blue = Homeowner fix

Red

  • Outdoor unit not running, using back-up heat
  • Low refrigerant charge
  • Refrigerant flow-related problem – restriction/bad metering device
  • Poor efficiency- needs cleaning and servicing
  • Bad reversing valve
  • Bad compressor valves
  • Compressor not running
  • Running in A/C mode
  • Outdoor unit iced-up because of a malfunction
  • Undersized equipment and/or ductwork

Blue

  • Outdoor unit iced-up – weather related
  • Snow drift against outdoor unit
  • Outdoor unit not running – check breaker
  • Extremely dirty air filter
  • Return duct leakage – pulling in cold, unconditioned air
  • Poorly insulated house, air leaks

The bottom causes in blue are commonly found problems and can be addressed by the homeowner. Try to check for these conditions first before calling for service.

Outdoor unit won’t come on:

This is a very common problem, whether it’s an air conditioner or a heat pump. And there are many things that can prevent the outdoor unit from starting, some of which can be quite serious.
Unfortunately, many times a service technician is dispatched only to find a simple problem that could have been addressed, even fixed by the homeowner.

Below is a list of possible causes. Items in red usually require a service call. Items in blue however can be addressed, some even fixed by the homeowner.

Red = Professional fix | Blue = Homeowner fix

Red

  • Faulty thermostat
  • Faulty contactor
  • Faulty time-delay relay
  • Faulty thermostat cable
  • Unit off due to an open safety device (low pressure, low temp, high pressure, high temp…)
  • Faulty control module

Blue

  • Thermostat not set properly
  • Emergency or shut-off switch turned off
  • Blown fuse in panel box
  • Circuit breaker tripped or off
  • Outdoor disconnect off
  • Condensate pump unplugged and/or safety switch open
  • Outdoor reset button tripped
  • Unit “locked-out”

The bottom causes in blue (shown above) are commonly found problems and can be addressed by the homeowner.

Here is a checklist to go through before making a service call:

  • Make sure there is a call from the thermostat.
  • Make sure no Emergency switches are off (including the furnace switch).
  • Make sure the breakers for the indoor and outdoor equipment are in the “on” position – reset if necessary.
  • Make sure the outdoor disconnect is on. Some have a pull-out plug that can be put in upside down preventing the unit from starting. Some have internal fuses or circuit breakers. If you know how to check fuses you may do so.
  • If you have a condensate pump with a safety switch, check to see if the pump is completely full of water. If so, make sure pump is plugged-in and hose isn’t clogged (could be a bad pump). Condensate pumps can usually be found near the indoor unit.
  • If your outdoor unit has a “Reset Button” press it. If that was the problem and you have to press it a second time, then there is a problem and a service call will be needed.
  • Your unit could have a safety device locking it out. Reset it by turning the system off at thermostat or breaker, wait 1 minute and turn back on. Wait up to 10 minutes to see if outdoor unit starts.

Please keep in mind that the information found on our website is provided free of charge and Hayward Air does not assume any liability resulting from the information we provide. We hope this information helps, but please note that these are just rough guidelines, and not all possible situations are covered. Your HVAC system should be inspected and repaired by a trained technician.

 

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  • Hayward Air came to our rescue during the brutal summer. Our system went down and our family and I were considering a Hotel.  John and his crew showed up and saved us a great deal of time relocating my family and office.  I would not call on anyone else to service our HVAC.

    Rick Brown, McKinney, TX
  • Hayward Air is the only company I would trust to service my air conditioning unit. They showed up on time and gave me an honest estimate and were very professional. I’ve told everyone I know about Hayward Air I expect they will have a flood of calls.

    JaVonna Smith, Frisco, TX